On Friday, we invoke the muse of motherhood to shine her light of inspiration upon us.

I have stumbled on several beautiful things this week (some new, and some I took off the bookshelf and rediscovered) that have sprouted fresh views and energy for me. May they spark some new light in you and your families, too. The first two are long-ish for us mamas, but they are worth it. Maybe bookmark them for when you do have time.

How to Truly Listen: A TED Talk with deaf percussionist Evelyn Glennie. Wow. She is extraordinary! I am not a musician and I loved this. I kept thinking of slowing down and listening (and opening) to my daughter with the same attention and curiosity.

THE LAST QUIET PLACES,  Krista Tippet interviews with Gordon Hempton on npr’s On Being. He defines real quiet (listening) as presence. He says if you want to be a better listener, go for a night walk with your child. How true.

And this book that has given me ideas, stories, gentle reminders and tools to talk so my daughter will listen and listen so my daughter will talk.

This conversation between a mother and her son. It inspires me to start going thru the many audio recordings+conversations I have with my daughter and stitch them together for listening back on someday.

This article by Harriet Lerner about listening in marriage/relationships…”Listening well is the ultimate spiritual act and the greatest gift that you can give to your partner.” Passionate listening.

And a passage from this classic (and one of my favorite) children’s books…

I used to know
an old man
who could
walk
by any
cornfield
and hear
the corn
singing.

“Teach me,”
I’d say
when we’d
passed on by.
(I never said
a word
while he was
listening.

“Just tell me
how
you learned
to hear
that
corn.”

And he’d say,
“It takes
a lot of
practice.
You can’t
be in a hurry.”

And I’d say,
“I have
the time.”

— from The Other Way to Listen by Byrd Baylor

I love this book. And isn’t this so true — when we are listening to our children’s spoken (and often unspoken) truths/needs/fears, we can’t be in a hurry.