Oh No!

By Larry Klipp
Playing Acey-Deucy with Woody, and the board resting on our knees near the rear of the ready room, I rolled six consecutive double sixes. Woody got upset and flipped the board and checkers over his shoulder towards the ready room front. End of that 1976 game !
 
 
Overly dramatic

John Swisher

By Renata Kraft

Hi, I’m not a Marine or a member of the Shamrocks but I found a picture for my buddy John Swisher of his Commanding Officer. The picture has the story with it. John you should share your picture. When I made Johns Quilt of Valor besides putting the USS America picture on his quilt he also wanted his Commanding Officer picture that I found for him on his quilt too. I can’t remember what John said the names were. When I came across the picture and the story I thought it was pretty neat. I found all of Johns military patches but one. I’ve never found his patch when he was on the Mediterranean Cruise.

People's Liberation Army Air Force

Current Active Inventory: 1,966 Aircraft

The following represents an overview of the modern aerial fighting capabilities of the People's Liberation Army Air Force (2023). The service currently counts 1,966 total units in its active aircraft inventory. The WDMMA review takes into account specific categories of aircraft covering attack, logistics, special-mission, and general support types. Inventory numbers and related aircraft types / variants are provided as-is and derived from publically-available information / sources. "Outlook" results are related to any future airframes currently under procurement though said airframes may not be delivered for service in the current year for various reasons. "Readiness Rates" are based on the published USAF standard. Due to discrepancies regarding UAV reporting between countries and sources, unmanned vehicles are currently not tracked by WDMMA.

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Trip-Trey

Formed at Cherry Point on 1 August 1943 as Marine Scout Bombing Squadron 333 (VMSB-333), the logically named “Trip Trey” began their career flying SBD Dauntless dive-bombers from Midway on anti-shipping patrols.

 Douglas SBD-5 Dauntless Dive Bomber of VMSB-333 over Wake Island. Douglas SBD-5 Dauntless Dive Bomber of VMSB-333 over Wake Island.

Memories from Conway Kangas

By Conway Kangas

I remember once and I think it was at Yuma. We had one CH-53 Sea Stallion that was shot by a jet that returned with hot guns even though the guns are pinned. I remember talking to a guy that caught  shrapnel in his leg and he got the rest of the day off. I believe it was an A4 that cooked it off or was it a helicopter, but anyway it was on the deck, already parked, and it shot across the ramp. Out of the four CH-53's. It took out the only one that was capable of flying, and I see there was another one where it was a Harrier that came in and the cockpit went open they gave the pilot permission to punch the cockpit because it was so hot in there but he didn't want to in case it set off the seat. I'm pretty sure that was at Yuma. I went to Yuma three or four times between 83 and 87 with VMFA's 122 and 333

There was the time in Japan when an A4 landed and it caught the last cable on the runway and the cable broke and that cable went like a helicopter blade in the air all the way over the enlisted barracks the swimming pool out into town just across from the fence and it took a Japanese car in the garage and put it about a foot into cement and the pilot had to swerve between the ditches at the very end of the runway I was at the swim pool at the time.

US Marines Giving Up Their Tanks

Article generated by ChatGPT AI

Abstract

This report examines the potential long-term consequences of the United States Marine Corps (USMC) decision to divest its tank units. Tanks have long been a critical component of the USMC's combat capabilities, providing armored firepower and maneuverability in various operational scenarios. Evaluating the effects of this strategic shift requires an analysis of the historical significance of tanks in the USMC, the evolving security landscape, and the implications for future Marine Corps operations.

1. Introduction

The USMC's decision to phase out its tank units represents a significant departure from its traditional force structure and operational capabilities. This report aims to assess the potential long-term effects of this decision, both in terms of operational effectiveness and broader strategic considerations.

US Marines Giving Up Artillery

Article generated by ChatGPT AI

Abstract

This report examines the potential long-term effects of the United States Marine Corps (USMC) giving up its artillery units. Artillery has traditionally been a vital component of Marine Corps combat capabilities, providing indirect fire support to infantry units. Evaluating the consequences of such a strategic shift requires an analysis of the USMC's historical use of artillery, the contemporary security landscape, and the implications for future Marine Corps operations.

1. Introduction

The decision to relinquish artillery units within the USMC represents a significant shift in the Marine Corps' force structure and operational capabilities. This report aims to assess the potential long-term effects of this decision, both in terms of operational effectiveness and broader strategic considerations.

Shaping Future Air Superiority

Article generated by ChatGPT AI

Abstract

The development of the United States' 6th generation fighter represents a significant milestone in military aviation. This report provides a comprehensive analysis of the US 6th generation fighter program, including its objectives, anticipated capabilities, technological advancements, and the potential implications for future air warfare and national security.

1. Introduction

The United States' pursuit of a 6th generation fighter aircraft is driven by the need to maintain air superiority in an increasingly complex and contested global environment. The 6th generation fighter is expected to build upon the capabilities of existing 5th generation aircraft like the F-35 and F-22, while incorporating cutting-edge technologies.

Does the Marine Corps Need Fighters?

Article generated by ChatGPT AI

The question of whether the U.S. Marine Corps (USMC) needs fighter jets is a matter of military strategy, budgetary considerations, and operational requirements. The USMC currently operates a fleet of fighter jets, primarily the F-18 Hornet and the more modern F-35B Lightning II. Here are some key factors to consider when assessing the need for fighter jets within the USMC:

  1. Amphibious Operations: The USMC's primary mission is to provide power projection from the sea. Fighter jets, especially the F-35B, which can operate from amphibious assault ships, play a crucial role in providing air support and air superiority during amphibious operations.

  2. Close Air Support (CAS): Fighter jets are vital for providing CAS to ground forces. The USMC often operates in close proximity to ground troops, and having their own fighter jets ensures rapid response and coordination with ground units.

VMFA-333 ASSOCIATION

From World War II to Operation Desert Storm. The "Fighting Shamrocks" from VMSB to VMFA have served and sacrificed gallantly every time it has been called upon. From the cold inside the Artic Circle at Bodo Norway to the heat and dirt of Balıkesir Turkey. Shamrocks have left their mark.

Headquarters

  • VMFA-333 Association
    115 Great Circle Road
    Apt. 474
    Nashville, TN, 37228